Boarder X
July 7 to October 21, 2018

Located in the Hill, Ipsco and N.C. Oils Galleries

Reclaim the Board.

EVENTS   I   SUMMER SCREENING PROGRAM   I   LIST OF ARTISTS

Boarder X brings together interdisciplinary contemporary art from artists of Indigenous nations across Canada who surf, skate and snowboard. In this exhibition these practices are vehicles to challenge conformity and status quo, as well as demonstrate knowledge and performed relationships with the land.

Reading the urban terrain, making a cement jungle a playground, riding the natural contours of the white immovable mountains or shredding the ever-changing waves: these are responses to the land. It is not about controlling land and water, but being humbled by their power. Beyond claiming space, the artwork recognizes human existence in relation to vast geographies and how we’ve thrived in those spaces. Surfing has a long history of Indigenous ways of being, originating from pre-contact Polynesian cultures. Skateboarding and snowboarding emerged beginning in the 60s and 80s respectively which for a time were popular in subcultures resisting the mainstream.

This exhibit will transform the gallery space and encourages active engagement through art, culture and boarding. It is an affirmation of cultural resilience and acknowledgement of ongoing respect and reverence for the land.

As part of the opening on July 6, a full scale halfpipe will be constructed in the Gallery with demos scheduled from local businesses, Tiki Room and Colonialism Skateboard along with our sponsor Vans. Visit our event page for more details.

We will also be offering a series films that will enhance the boarding experience with ground-breaking films such as Afterglow, Riding Giants and Northern Grease. Visit our Summer Screening Program page for more details.

List of artists inlcude:

Jordan Bennett
Colonialism Boards (Michael Langan and Kent Monkman collaboration)
Bracken Hanuse Corlett
Roger Crait
Steven Thomas Davies
Mark Igloliorte
Mason Mashon
Meagan Musseau
Meghann O'Brien
Les Ramsay
Amanda Strong.

This exhibition debut at the Winnipeg Art Gallery and is curated by Jaimie Isaac, the WAG’s recently appointed Curator of Indigenous and Contemporary Art. Regina is the first stop on the exhibition’s national tour.

Photo: Mason Mashon, digital photograph

National Indigenous Day Screening

June 21, 2018 at 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM

Everyone Welcome   I   Admission is free

Presented as part of our Summer Screening Program for Boarder X which opens on July 6

Please join us at the MacKenzie Art Gallery for an evening of short animations created by Indigenous filmmakers; Colton Wilier, Tasha Hubbard and Amanda Strong.

Selected Shorts:

  • Skateboarder Pants (Directed by Colton Willier, 1 min 32 sec, 2017) A pair of pants rages through town, on a skateboard.
  • Shirtnami (Directed by Colton Willier, 2 min 15 sec, 2017) A Shirtnami takes over a town, only to be conquered by Skateboarding Pants.
  • Buffalo Calling (Directed by Tasha Hubbard, 14 minutes, 2014) Buffalo Calling combines live action and animation to tell the story of one of the last herds of buffalo on the prairies. 
  • Four Faces of the Moon (Directed by Amanda Strong, 13 min 40 sec, 2016) Four Faces of the Moon follows the animated journey of an Indigenous photographer as she travels through time. She witnesses moments in her family's history and strengthens her connection to her Métis, Cree and Anishnaabe ancestors. This is a personal story, told in four chapters through the eyes of director and writer Amanda Strong. The oral and written history of her family reveals the story — we witness the impact and legacy of the railways, the slaughter of the buffalo and colonial land policies.
    Four Faces of the Moon contains no English language, relying on sound, image and Indigenous voices to tell the story. This multi-layered approach to storytelling may leave you with more questions than answers: it is an invitation to look into your own understanding of history, legacy and the importance in knowing who you are and where you come from.

Image credit: Still from Four Faces of the Moon, Amanda Strong